Discussing Methods: The History of Economic Thought as the History of Practices with Thomas Stapleford, Episode 2

In this episode, we briefly talk about methods in the History of Economic Thought, before discussing with Thomas Stapleford his paper Historical Epistemology and the History of Economics: Views Through the Lens of Practice. In this paper, Stapleford argues for approaching the history of economic thought as a history of practices. This paper was also on of the topic of a one-day workshop for young scholars organised this May by Maria and Reinhard before the annual conference of the European Society for the History of Economic Thought.

  • Information about the workshop can be found here.

A list of the literature mentioned and discussed in the episode:

  • Bakhtin, M. 1986. Speech Genres and Other Late Essays. Trans. Vern W. McGee. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.
  • Bakhtin, M. 1992. The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays, Austin: University of Texas Press.
  • Dalston, L. and Galison, P., 2007. Objectivity. MIT Press. Link
  • Foucault, M. 1982. The archaeology of knowledge. (A. M. Sheridan Smith, Trans.). New York: Pantheon Books.
  • Foucault, M. 1988. Politics, philosophy, culture: interviews and other writings, 1977-1984. (L. D. Kritzman, Ed.). New York: Routledge.
  • Holquist, M. 1990. Dialogism: Bakhtin and his World. London; New York: Routledge.
  • Stapleford, T.A., 2017. Historical Epistemology and the History of Economics: Views Through the Lens of Practice. In Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Symposium on the Historical Epistemology of Economics (pp. 113-145). Emerald Publishing Limited. Link
  • Warwick, A. 1992. Cambridge mathematics and Cavendish physics: Cunningham, Campbell and Einstein’s relativity, 1905-1911. Part I: The uses of theory. Part II: Comparing traditions in Cambridge physics. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science A, 23, 625–656.
  • Wylie, A., 1992. The interplay of evidential constraints and political interests: recent archaeological research on gender. American antiquity, 57(1), pp.15-35.

Introducing Ceteris non Paribus: The History of Economic Thought Podcast, Episode 1

In this short introductory episode, we shortly outline the objectives of this podcast and explain the name Ceteris non Paribus. We are a group of young scholars starting a podcast in the history of economic thought and you’ll hear the voices from the following young scholars in this episode:

Addtionally, you’ll briefly hear Gonçalo L. Fonseca, the creator of The History of Economic Thought Website.

This episode was hosted and produced by Maria and Reinhard.